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Rates of Complications and Mortality in Older Patients With Diabetes Mellitus The Diabetes and Aging Study

ABSTRACT Importance  In the coming decades, the population of older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus is expected to grow substantially. Understanding the clinical course of diabetes in this population is critical for establishing evidence-based clinical practice recommendations, identifying research priorities, allocating resources, and setting health care policies. Objective  To contrast the rates of diabetes complications and mortality across age and diabetes duration categories. Design, Setting, and Participants  This cohort study (2004-2010) included 72 310 older (≥60 years) patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in a large, integrated health care delivery system. Incidence densities…

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Tea: Drink to your health?

I’ve never been much of a tea drinker. To me, the flavor is reminiscent of twigs soaked in warm dishwater. I don’t mean to disparage the tea enthusiasts who “ooh” over their oolong and cherish every drop of their chai. Quite the opposite, in fact. I’m as green as Japanese sencha every time another study emerges, steeped with praise about the health benefits of the beverage I’m not drinking. This month my envy was particularly strong, when The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition featured not one, but 11 new studies highlighting the…

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More Than a Billion People Taking Statins? Potential Implications of the New Cardiovascular Guidelines

The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines on assessment of cardiovascular risk1 and on treatment of blood cholesterol, which included recommendations for primary prevention with statins,2 came under intense criticism immediately with their release. Main concerns focused on flawed methods (problems with the risk calculation),3ethics (conflicts of interest),4 and inferences (too many people offered treatment). The ACC and the AHA are among the most experienced organizations in medicine that develop guidelines. Their processes are meticulous, including transparent reporting of conflicts. The work behind the guidelines’ development was monumental. References to randomized…

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Transverse Myelitis — a Review of the Presentation, Diagnosis, and Initial Management

Abstract: Myelitis is a rare neurological disorder of the spinal cord that is caused by inflammation and can have devastating neurologic effects with up to two-thirds of patients having a moderate to severe degree of residual disability. Symptoms typically develop over hours or days and then worsen over a matter of days to weeks. Patients can present with sensory alteration, weakness, and autonomic dysfunction including bowel and bladder problems, temperature dysregulation, or even bouts of hypertension. Evaluation for compressive etiologies must be a priority as compressive myelopathy and transverse myelitis are…

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Hepatitis B- Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.

HEPATITIS B YESTERDAY By 1970, the hepatitis B virus had been identified and shown to be a major cause of acute and chronic liver disease. Reliable but somewhat insensitive tests for the virus were newly available. Hepatitis B was the most common cause of acute liver disease in the United States with an estimated 200,000 to 300,000 persons infected annually with the hepatitis B virus, including approximately 20,000 children. The United States was in the midst of an epidemic of hepatitis B that lasted into the 1980s. Hepatitis B was…

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Severe Psoriasis Doubles Risk of Kidney Disease, Penn Medicine Study Shows

PHILADELPHIA — The latest look at connections between psoriasis and other serious medical conditions revealed for the first time that people with more serious cases of psoriasis are at twice the risk of developing  chronic kidney disease and four times the risk of developing end stage renal disease requiring dialysis. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that patients with mild forms of the disease are not at an increased risk, but those with psoriasis on more than 3 percent of their body are…

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Latest MRI Technology Improves Speed and Image Quality

As it turned out, the move from Tim to Tim 4G was a leap in progress every bit as impressive as the upgrade to Tim back in 2006: which at that time also brought improvements in acquisition speed, and image quality. “One might think that scanning faster takes the image quality down, but it is quite the opposite,” Dehem says. “For abdominal imaging, patients now only need to hold their breath for ten seconds; whereas, in the past, it took 20 seconds. This is a phenomenal difference. The high coil…

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Krokodil the flesh-eating drug spreads to Chicago suburbs with three cases in a week

Use of a a flesh-eating heroin substitute that rots the skin of addicts has now spread to a Chicago suburb, according to local media reports. Krokodil, which is considered more addictive that heroin, originated in Russia before cases were seen in Arizona last month. The latest reports of three cases at the Presence St. Joseph Medical Center in the Joliet suburb of Chicago, is likely to spark further fears that use of the drug, which usually kills addicts within two years, is spreading in the US. According to NBC Chicago…

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Health News News 

Nano-Dissection Identifies Genes Involved in Kidney Disease

Understanding how genes act in specific tissues is critical to our ability to combat many human diseases, from heart disease to kidney failure to cancer. Yet isolating individual cell types for study is impossible for most human tissues. A new method developed by researchers at Princeton University and the University of Michigan called “in siliconano-dissection” uses computers rather than scalpels to separate and identify genes from specific cell types, enabling the systematic study of genes involved in diseases. The team used the new method to successfully identify genes expressed in…

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New discovery in Parkinson’s Disease Research

The content of this post is not by DMP. Summary Scientists have discovered that an active ingredient in an over-the-counter skin cream slows or stops the effects of Parkinson’s disease on brain cells.  Highlights Scientists identified the link through biochemical and cellular studies, and the research team is now testing the drug in animal models of Parkinson’s. In 2004, researchers studying an Italian family with a high prevalence of early-onset Parkinson’s disease discovered mutations in a protein called PINK1 associated with the inherited form of the disease. The HHMI research…

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