Drugs and Supplements 

Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: an interview with Dr. Michael Dudley

What are Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and why are they difficult to treat? Enterobacteriaceae refer to the family of bacteria such as E. coli and Klebsiella that are bacterial pathogens most frequently associated with hospital-acquired infections. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are those bacteria that have acquired genes or mutations that are resistant to many beta-lactam antibiotics, notably the carbapenem class of antimicrobial agents. Carbapenems are a class of beta-lactams, which are broad-spectrum antibiotics known to be the most effective against gram-negative infections. Resistant forms of CRE, such as as KPC (Klebsiella pneumoniaecarbapenemase)…

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Health News 

More People Under 50 Getting Colon Cancer

Though guidelines suggest screening starts at 50, researcher says it’s premature to change them   Colon cancer rates are rising among men and women under 50, the age at which guidelines recommend screenings start, a new analysis shows. One in seven colon cancer patients is under 50. Younger patients are more likely to have advanced stage cancer, but they live slightly longer without a cancer recurrence because they are treated aggressively, the researchers reported. “Colon cancer has traditionally been thought of as a disease of the elderly,” said study lead…

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Health News 

Zika virus can be sexually transmitted but ‘we shouldn’t compare it with HIV’

The Zika virus, which is currently most prevalent in Brazil, can be sexually transmitted. But that’s not an aspect experts are worried about the most, as virologist Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit tells DW.   The Zika virus is spreading to almost all countries in North- and South America. Can the virus be transmitted directly from one person to another? Professor Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit: It is mainly transmitted through mosquitoes. The Zika virus can also be sexually transmitted, but that’s not what usually happens. One issue however is that the majority of those infected…

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Ghana Health News 

Free condom distribution reduced HIV/AIDS rate – MP

The Member of Parliament for Salaga and Ranking Member on the Public Accounts Committee (PAC), Ibrahim Dey Abubakari, has defended government’s decision to spend over GHc1 million to supply free male condoms to some Ghanaians. He argues that the free condom distribution was a wise decision because it has contributed to a decline in Ghana’s HIV/AIDS prevalence rate. “Prevention is better than cure. Don’t you see that the percentage of infection of AIDS has reduced in the country; don’t you see that the supply of condoms has contributed to this?…

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Ghana Health News 

Volta Region records suspected cases of meningitis

The Volta Region has recorded seven suspected cases of meningitis, Dr Yaw Ofori-Yeboah, Deputy Director, Public Health of the Volta Regional Health Directorate, told the Ghana News Agency (GNA) on Tuesday. He said samples of all the cases have been sent for laboratory investigations whilst the patients were receiving treatment at health facilities in the Region. Dr Ofori-Yebioah said the cases were from Sogakope, Keta, Ketu-North, Krachi-West and Nkwanta South. He said reports indicate that the result of the case from Sogakope is negative adding that the Region’s surveillance system…

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Life Style 

Is it better to run outside or on a treadmill?

Runners have always had a view on whether treadmill running is easier than doing it outdoors. Michael Mosley weighs up his options. For those of us who rather optimistically made a New Year’s resolution to do a bit more exercise, running is the obvious and popular option. But is it better to do your running outdoors, in the wind and rain, or to go down to your local gym and work up a sweat on the treadmill, while surreptitiously admiring your reflection in a giant mirror? It’s not something I’ve…

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Health News 

Zika virus: Outbreak ‘likely to spread across Americas’ says WHO

The Zika virus is likely to spread across nearly all of the Americas, the World Health Organization has warned. The infection, which causes symptoms including mild fever, conjunctivitis and headache, has already been found in 21 countries in the Caribbean, North and South America. It has been linked to thousands of babies being born with underdeveloped brains and some countries have advised women not to get pregnant. No treatment or vaccine is available. The virus was first detected in 1947 in monkeys in Africa. There have since been small, short-lived…

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Life Style 

Everything you ever wanted to know about coughs (but were too busy spluttering to ask)

Coughing is generally a good thing: it is a reflex action that keeps the airways clear of mucus, dust, smoke and bugs – and most coughs clear up by themselves within three weeks. But if a cough lasts longer than this and is getting gradually worse, it is worth seeing a GP. Breathlessness, coughing up blood, unexplained weight loss, persistent hoarseness or lumps in the neck are all warning signs that need urgent medical attention. The commonest cause In adults, the most common cause of a longstanding cough is upper…

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Health News 

Childhood obesity ‘an exploding nightmare’, says health expert

The number of children under five who are overweight or obese has risen to 41 million, from 31 million in 1990, according to figures released by a World Health Organization commission. The statistics, published by the Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity, mean that 6.1% of under-fives were overweight or obese in 2014, compared with 4.8% in 1990. The number of overweight children in lower middle-income countries more than doubled over the same period, from 7.5 million to 15.5 million. In 2014, 48% of all overweight and obese children aged under…

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Drugs and Supplements 

Anatomy of the cost of a new drug

The cost of drugs is in the headlines following the decision by NHS watchdog NICE that a new cancer treatment should not be funded. Its cost? More than £90,000 per patient for an extra six months of life. But how are such figures reached? The drug – Kadcyla – was developed by Roche. And for commercial reasons it has so far not revealed the methods behind its pricing strategy. Lab testing and trials But to really understand the cost of developing a new drug you have to go back to…

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