News 

This Is Why Some People Have Those Little Holes Above Their Ears

You might have noticed that a few people have a barely noticeable hole where the top of their ear cartilage meets their face. Believe it or not, it’s probably not the remnants of an old piercing they had when they were 15. Just 0.1 percent of the population have it in the US, 0.9 percent in the UK, and as many as 4 to 10 percent in Asia and parts of Africa, according to one study. In South Korea, that figure could be as high as 5 percent, and it’s most common…

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Health News 

Feed Your Gut Microbes Well, Lest They Feed on You

The truth of the old adage that “you are what you eat” is becoming increasingly clear, the more we learn about the microbiome — the colonies of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses and fungi that live in your gut. It’s been well-established that your gut acts as a second brain, providing all sorts of input to your brain. This input not only affects your mood and general well-being, but also your immune responses and nervous system functioning. Your microbiome is individual to you, much like your fingerprints, and is a reflection…

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Drugs and Supplements 

Precision Matters When It Comes to Protein

The low-carb diet made its initial appearance as a weight loss aid some 25 years ago. At the time, most people recommended replacing non-vegetable carbohydrates with high amounts of protein, and these low-carb, high-protein diets (such as Atkins) worked quite well for the purpose of shedding weight. Indeed, eating more protein is still frequently recommended for weight loss as it does help reduce appetite, and may slow down digestion of carbohydrates, thereby preventing harmful blood sugar spikes. The problem with this recommendation is that eating too much protein also has…

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Tech and Entertainment 

Smartphones, Tablets and Weight Gain in Teens

Study found obesity risk up 43 percent if kids used screen devices more than 5 hours a day Teens glued to their tablet, smartphone or computer for hours on end may be more likely to become obese, a new study suggests. Those who used screen devices for five or more hours daily were twice as likely to drink more sugary beverages and engage in too little physical activity, the researchers found. As a result, these teens showed a 43 percent increased risk of obesity compared with kids who don’t use…

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Is Daily Aspirin Therapy a Wise Choice?

By Dr. Mercola Low-dose aspirin therapy has long been recommended to lower your risk of heart attack, and an estimated 36 percent of American adults are currently on it. Think about it: That’s more than 1 in 3 persons in the U.S. The conventional justification for this recommendation is that aspirin slightly decreases your blood’s ability to form dangerous clots due to prostaglandin inhibition. However, a number of studies have refuted its benefits, and there’s no shortage of controversy surrounding this subject. In 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration…

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Health News 

Scientists Discover More Clues to Stuttering

A blend of brain circuits are altered in people who stutter, new research indicates. Using an imaging technique that looks at brain cell metabolism, scientists learned that changes in areas involved in speech, attention and emotion are all linked to stuttering. Stuttering is characterized by involuntarily repeating certain sounds, syllables or words when speaking. The imaging method used for the study is known as proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). “It is a fundamental measure of the density of [nerve] tissue in these circuits that seem to not have developed properly,”…

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Life Style 

Could White Wine Boost Your Melanoma Risk?

A new study raises the possibility that people who enjoy a glass of white wine every day may face a slightly elevated risk of melanoma. Total alcohol intake was associated with a 14 percent higher risk of melanoma per drink per day, researchers found. But, when they looked at the type of alcohol consumed, white wine emerged as the potential culprit. Each drink per day of white wine was associated with a 13 percent higher risk of melanoma, the researchers said. “Per drink” risk was based on 12.8 grams of…

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Health News 

Many With Postconcussion Syndrome Don’t Recover

Only 27 percent of population recovered; 67 percent of those who recovered did so in first year A minority of patients with postconcussion syndrome (PCS) recover, with two-thirds of those who recover doing so within one year, according to a study published online Nov. 29 in the Journal of Neurotrauma. Carmen Hiploylee, from the University of Toronto, and colleagues examined recovery from PCS in a series of 285 patients with concussion meeting international sport concussion criteria who received a questionnaire regarding recovery. Data were reviewed for 110 eligible respondents, with…

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Health News 

Colon Cancer On The Rise Among Young Adults

Three different doctors over 3 years dismissed Ashley Flynn’s complaints. “I had blood in my stool, and each doctor pushed it off as if it were fissures or hemorrhoids or something else minor,” says Flynn, who lives outside Kansas City, KS. But it wasn’t something minor. Flynn was only 24 when she was diagnosed in 2011 with stage 3 rectal cancer. She had surgery and chemotherapy beginning in late 2011 and has been cancer-free since August 2012. Cases of colon and rectal cancer are on the rise in people under…

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Health News 

7 Weird Signs of Health Troubles

You don’t need a crystal ball to predict your future health—just your five senses. Whether you realize it or not, many conditions and diseases start with physical changes you may not pinpoint as problematic. The good news: If you know what to look for, you can spot many issues early—and treat them fast. Here are seven ways your body could be signaling a health hazard. Check Your: Sense of Smell 2/8 Check Your: Sense of Smell For: Alzheimer’s disease. A decline in sniff-ability could be one of the earliest signs…

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