Drugs and Supplements 

Maternal Use of Acetaminophen Linked to ADHD in Offspring Link seen after adjustment for maternal use before pregnancy, familial risk for ADHD

Maternal use of acetaminophen in pregnancy is associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in offspring, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in Pediatrics. Eivind Ystrom, Ph.D., from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo, and colleagues examined the association of maternal use of acetaminophen during pregnancy and of paternal use before pregnancy with ADHD in offspring. Diagnoses were obtained for 112,973 offspring from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, including 2,246 with ADHD. The researchers identified a modest association between any prenatal maternal use of acetaminophen in…

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Health News 

Grandmother-of-10 ditches chemotherapy after she claims CANNABIS oil caused her cancerous breast tumour to shrink to an eighth of the size and her case will now be studied by scientists

Lin Coxon, 69, from Derby, took the ¬£39 oil while waiting for treatment Told she needed eight rounds of chemotherapy, a lumpectomy and¬†radiotherapy But before she had it, scans showed 33mm tumour had shrunk and is now 4mm Cancer also spread to lymph nodes which have reduced from 25mm to 10mm Researchers at St George’s, University of London, are now looking at her case Lin is one of ‘a growing and large collection’ of patient testimonies, they said A grandmother-of-ten has claimed her cancerous breast tumour has shrunk to an…

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Health News 

The nurse hired to combat cancer myths online

A cancer charity has appointed a digital nurse to combat “fake news” online, which they say leaves patients “scared and at risk of bogus cures”. Macmillan Cancer Support found two-fifths of people with cancer looked up information about their diagnosis on the internet. One in eight of those went online because they didn’t fully understand what their doctor had told them. Glaswegian nurse Ellen McPake, who landed the job, says she wants to correct the misinformation that exists. She said: “Once the doctor says ‘cancer’, people automatically then shut down…

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Health News 

Paralysed woman’s life-sustaining treatment ‘can end’, judge rules

A paralysed elderly woman whose care became the focus of a family dispute can have her life-sustaining treatment discontinued, a judge has ruled. The 72-year-old was left “minimally conscious” after suffering an aneurysm following a fall in 2016. Doctors wanted artificial feeding to continue but relatives were divided. A judge concluded the woman would have viewed her “present high level of dependency and minimal awareness” to be a “travesty of life”. The matter came before a Court of Protection hearing, sitting in Preston, where issues relating to people who lack…

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Ghana Health News 

Stroke is killing more people than malaria

Forty per cent of stroke patients who seek treatment at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital hardly survive. Records show 233 out of 369 people admitted at the facility for the condition could not survive. This was revealed at the World Stroke Day marked at Bantama-Kumasi Ashanti Region, under the theme “recognizing the risks factors of stroke.” Neurologist, Dr. Fred Stephen Sarfo who made the revelation says the disease currently kills more people than malaria, though there are no records available to immediately compare. His conclusion is based on the growing…

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Ghana Health News 

Ghana still recording high maternal, neonatal mortality – Health Minister

Maternal mortality ratio is still as high as 319 per 100,000 live births and the neonatal mortality rate is 29 per 1,000 live births, the Health Minister has disclosed. Kwaku Agyeman-Manu said there are still significant variations in health and nutrition status across wealth quintiles and geographic regions in Ghana. He said he was committed to making every effort to improve the maternal and child health status in the country. The Ministry of Health (MOH) and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) have signed a new technical cooperation agreement to produce…

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Drugs and Supplements 

Alzheimer’s nutrient drink falters in clinical trial

There is no good evidence that a nutrient drink being sold online in the UK to “help” people with early Alzheimer’s actually slows the disease, say experts. Latest trial results in patients who took Souvenaid did not find it preserves memory and thinking. The authors say in Lancet Neurology that bigger studies are needed to show if the product can work as hoped. And consumers should be aware that the ¬£3.49 per bottle drink “is not a cure”. Manufacturer Nutricia says its drink should only be taken under the direction…

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Diet 

New Finding: Broccoli Helps Heal Leaky Gut

Broccoli, a close relative of Brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower, is perhaps most well-known for its chemoprotective properties. It’s an excellent source of phytonutrient glucosinolates, flavonoids and other health-boosting antioxidant and anticancer compounds. One of the compounds in broccoli known to have anticancer activity is sulforaphane, a naturally occurring organic sulfur. Studies have shown sulforaphane supports normal cell function and division while causing apoptosis (programmed cell death) in colon, prostate, breast and tobacco-induced lung cancer cells, and reducing the number of cancerous liver tumors in mice. Three servings of broccoli…

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Health News 

Heart surgery survival chances ‘better in the afternoon’

Open heart surgery appears to be safer in the afternoon because of the body’s internal clock, scientists have said. The body clock – or circadian rhythm – is the reason we want to sleep at night, but it also drives huge changes in the way our bodies work. The research, published in the Lancet, suggests the heart is stronger and better able to withstand surgery in the afternoon than the morning. And it says the difference is not down to surgeons being tired in the morning. Doctors need to stop…

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Health News 

Separated twin ‘opens eyes’ four days after surgery

One of twin Indian boys who were conjoined at the head has opened his eyes four days after historic surgery to separate them, a doctor says. Two-year-old Jaga has also responded to simple commands, including moving his limbs. He is on a ventilator and needs daily dialysis due to kidney problems. His brother, Kalia, is not yet conscious and has suffered seizures. The boys were born with shared blood vessels and brain tissues and it took 16 hours of surgery to separate them. A team of 30 doctors carried out…

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