Health News 

Bacteria as Sensors

Imagine going to the doctor’s office and a simple administration of a microbe could detect whether you had a life threatening disease in its earliest stages. This is using bacteria as biological sensors. For years, they’ve been used to detect pollution in our rivers, lakes, pools and drinking water. Now they can be used to diagnose medical conditions such as tumors in our colons. In a new study, scientists have modified the gut bacterium, E. coli, to be a living sensor for diseases as diverse as diabetes and liver cancer….

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Diet Life Style 

WHO: Processed meat linked to cancer; red meat is risky, too

PARIS (AP) — It’s official: Ham, sausage and other processed meats can lead to colon, stomach and other cancers — and red meat is probably cancer-causing, too. While doctors have long warned against eating too much meat, the World Health Organization’s cancer agency gave the most definitive response yet Monday about its relation to cancer — and put processed meats in the same danger category as cigarettes or asbestos. A group of 22 scientists from the WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France evaluated more than 800…

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Health News News 

World Health Organization’s Ranking of the World’s Health Systems

Some people fancy all health care debates to be a case of Canadian Health Care vs. American. Not so. According to the World Health Organization’s ranking of the world’s health systems, neither Canada nor the USA ranks in the top 25. Improving the Canadian Healthcare System does not mean we must emulate the American system, but it may mean that perhaps we can learn from countries that rank better than both Canada and the USA at keeping their citizens healthy. World Health Organization Ranking; The World’s Health Systems 1 France…

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Health News News 

World’s first trial of stem cell therapy in the womb

Their bones are so brittle that they fracture while in the womb. Now a clinical trial of stem cell therapy in the womb aims to help babies born with brittle bone disease start life with stronger skeletons. “To our knowledge, this is the first clinical trial using stem cells in the womb,” says Cecilia Götherström of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, and coordinator of the Europe-wide trial. “A few cases have been done before, including by us, but there has been no proper trial.” Brittle bone disease, or osteogenesis…

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Health News 

What causes pain in penis?

Penis pain can affect the base of your penis, the shaft of the penis, the head of the penis or the foreskin. Penis pain can be a result of an accident or disease, and can affect males of any age. What Causes Penis Pain? Penis pain may occur due to the following reasons: Peyronie’s Disease Peyronie’s disease starts when an inflammation causes a thin sheet of scar tissue, called plaque, to form along the upper or lower sides of the penis. Because the scar tissue forms next to the tissue…

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Health News 

Is dying in hospital better than home in incurable cancer and what factors influence this? A population-based study

A study published today in BMC Medicine has shown that those who die at home have a more peaceful experience than those who die in hospital, and have similar levels of pain. The study also revealed that relatives of patients who die at home experience less grief than when the death occurs in hospital. However, ensuring a good home death requires wide-ranging support, including a discussion of preferences, access to a comprehensive home care package and facilitation of family caregiving. Today’s findings are based on the results of questionnaires completed…

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How the 2015 UK general election will affect pharmacy

Five years ago I was fighting for political survival as a Liberal Democrat MP, and failed. Now, for the first general election in many years, I am not branded Lib Dem through and through, like a stick of Brighton rock. This year, as vice chair of the English Pharmacy Board, my focus is predominately on what the political parties will do for pharmacy’s role in patient care and how this election will affect the work of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). We are currently in purdah, which is essentially a…

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Drugs and Supplements News 

Dietary supplements linked to increased cancer risk

Consumers are always looking for ways to minimize their cancer risk, which is one reason why many turn to over-the-counter vitamin and mineral supplements. But new research finds that while companies promote dietary supplements for their cancer-prevention benefit, some may end up doing more harm than good. Dr. Tim Byers, director for cancer prevention and control at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, conducted a meta-analysis of two decades worth of research — 12 trials that involved more than 300,000 people — and found a number of supplements actually made a person much more…

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News 

WHO Issues its First Hepatitis B Treatment Guidelines

GENEVA – WHO issued its first-ever guidance for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B, a viral infection which is spread through blood and body fluids, attacking the liver and resulting in an estimated 650 000 deaths each year – most of them in low- and middle-income countries. People with chronic hepatitis B infection are at increased risk of dying from cirrhosis and liver cancer. Effective medicines exist that can prevent people developing these conditions so they live longer. But most people who need these medicines are unable to access them or…

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News 

Phase 1 trial of first Ebola vaccine based on 2014 virus strain shows vaccine is safe and provokes an immune response

Results from the first phase 1 trial of an Ebola vaccine based on the current (2014) strain of the virus are today published in The Lancet. Until now, all tested Ebola virus vaccines have been based on the virus strain from the Zaire outbreak in 1976. The results suggest that the new vaccine is safe, and provokes an immune response in recipients, although further long-term testing will be needed to establish whether it can protect against the Ebola virus. A team of researchers, led by Professor Fengcai Zhu, from the Jiangsu…

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